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by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
's not an exact science, it's a snapshot in time. we will see if governor romney can sustain this bounce. the president got one ahead of his convention. it dissipated. romney got one out of the first debate. we'll see if it lasts. this science is not exact but it's pretty darned good. if you look back over time, it's pretty darned good. when you see the conspiracy theories you have to say it's the politics of the moment. every now and then you see a poll that you say well, that doesn't look right. i look at ours every time before we put them on the air and the guys who do it for us do it just right. >> go ahead, gloria. >> anderson, i also think it actually kind of affects the campaign in its own way because as the old saying goes, nothing sticks to you like success so when you have a candidate like mitt romney who has been down, maybe some of his voters are less enthusiastic because they think oh, he might not win. suddenly, he's got the wind at his back. suddenly they're thinking gosh, maybe this guy can win, maybe i ought to turn out and vote. then his base might become more enthusias
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
. and a lot of bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
from poll to poll. there's no science to this. polls will differ on that number, depending on what they're finding in the field and it will drive you crazy to dig deep into the poll and say this one has more democrats, this one has more republicans. look at the trends over time. we have two polls. we want ten polls off this debate, we want to know where the race really is. all we have is gallup and pew. it's showing a huge bump up for romney. all these polls have a house effect. over time they all show in the course of 2012 a little bit of an advantage for one candidate or another. rasmussen very often shows a pro-republican house effect. pew has very often shown a pro-obama effect. it makes this huge romney lead even more surprising. wait for a week's worth of polls and we'll see where the race stands. as you point out, this is the best news romney has had since before his convention. >> does this couldn't as an october surprise. >> usually october surprises is some outside event that changes the election or something -- some conspiracy that a campaign polls at the last second to advan
with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the new jobs out there now. help us work with colleges and universities to keep tuition down. that is a goal we can meet together. you cannot choose that future for america -- can choose that future for america, but what we need to do? >> vote. >> i have already worked with republicans and democrats to cut spending by $1 trillion. i'm willing to do a little bit more. i want to reform our tax code so that idea is simple and fair. but i also want to ask the wealthiest households in america to pay slightly higher taxes. that is the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a whole lot of millionaires to boot. [applause] so that is my plan. in fairness, my opponent has got a plan, too. there's only one problem. some of you heard bill clinton say that there is no or arithmetic in it. [laughter] they think that
academy of sciences in stockholm made the announcement on tuesday. professor hideshi hara from the ecole normale superieure paris and university of colorado physicist david wineland were honored for their breakthroughs in quantum physics. they studied the interaction of light and matter. the field has been rapidly progressing since the mid-80s. haroche and wineland's research is serving as the basis for super fast computers currently in development. >>> japan's prime minister has achieved something he won't be celebrating. an nhk poll suggests the support rate for yoshihiko noda and his cabinet has fallen to its lowest level since his government was sworn in september last year. nhk surveyed 1,056 people between saturday and monday. participants were aged 20 and older. they gave the cabinet the support rate of 26%. that's down five percentage points from last month's survey. the number of voter who is don't support the cabinet is up by five points to 58%. the support rate for the prime minister's democratic party hit its lowest level since it took office. it fell by three percentage poin
with the -- its struggles with the slowing economy. another medical device maker, edward life sciences, its stock is up about 23% so far this year. it is taking a huge hit in today's session, down about 18% right now. it said that its third quarter sales are going to be weak. their heart valve sales in particular they said have been hurt by european us-- european austerity measures. they also said slower than expected growth in the united states hurt earnings there as well. coming up after the bell, alcoa and yum! brands, we will have a preview, same time next hour. connell dagen back to you. connell: keep it here on markets now talking about small business with big problems. dagen: the head of the national federation of independent business with a dire warning about the business environment. coming up in moments. >> announcer: meet mary. she loves to shop online with her debit card, and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard-earned money. now meet jack. after 40 years, he finally saved enough to enjoy retirement. angie, the waitr
. most people understand how easy it is to break a heart but how about making one? t health science reporter carolyn johnson looks at blue print on how we treat heart and print on how we treat heart and heart disease >> even through a microscope there is no miss taking the rift mick beating. living heart cell were created in a bay area lab and help researchers unlock the secret of how a heart becomes a heart. >> helps to have a blue print. to know what switches exist. how they are connected and what they turn on or shut off. >> so bruno and his team at san francisco glad stone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked inside the dna of of stem cell to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> with these the modification are doing is they are setting the right switches to turn gene on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >>reporter: to begin researchers jeffrey alexander coax millions of stem cell taken from mice into becoming beating heart cell, process didn't in petrie dish and they mimic the environment in the woom. not always a pre-s
and in advances in engineering and science. >> be interesting to see and crazy if he's able to do it. let's talk about your book "mousetronaut." >> the true part of this story, in 2001 i was the pilot. we had 18 mice. of those 18 mice 17 stayed kind of latched on to the inside of their cages. very nervous about being in space. one little guy seemed to get it, enjoyed weightlessness. we enjoyed watching him a little bit and that was until period us the to this story. >> it took a bunch of years before you turned it into a children's book. why did you think it should be a children's book. why did you go into that area? >> well, you know, we have a crisis in education in this country. and, you know, by most measures and some different coordination when you look at where the united states is, you know, whether it's early childhood education or math scores for high school students, we're often not even in the top 50 any more where we used to be at the top. i think it's important to have, you know, material for young kids to be interested in, and, you know, my experience has been that kids are interes
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
science. you don't want to pick winners and losers in the companies that are going to survive. national science foundation obviously. >> good loan guarantees can be targeted. there are many ways to do things. one of the things that arianna has been discussing and i've found very compelling is this notion that we should provide opportunities and channels for national service in a variety of industries. this is something industry could do. i've been very involved with teach for america but you could have not only a teacher's corps, you could have medical corps, you could have financial services corps of young people coming out of college, having trouble finding a job but with industry associations, companies saying we're going to create interns and a service program where people can work for a year, maybe two years, learning a trade, learning a profession, whether they're trying to do legal services for america or financial services for america, or health or for that matter engineering, encoding, i think there are many ways for the private sector to work together with government to say he
at a typewriter or a scientist thinking hard but what about having the science? and for him as a composer it was exciting because he wanted his music to evolve knowing about this. it represent this is extra dimension. so he does electronic music to have something that parallels that. for me i tried to explain all these complicated threads that led us to where we were today and the idea of having these many different voices, the voices of people and the visuals i realized what a rich forum opera is. we think of it as in the past but it's such a rich way to convey the sense of an idea, what's going on spchlt and the idea that it was going to premier at the pompidou center made it that much more attractive. >> are there similarities and scientific creativity and artistic creative any >> you know, there really are in many ways and i'm always intrigued by how a t of the good people in the arts are problem solvers the same way they're problem solvers, they're trying to get from one point to another and they're trying to find the route to do it. in fact, a work together with an artist on an art
years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who plunged penn state university into scandal by his sexual abuse of young boys over many years was sentenced today. the judge called his crime a "story of betrayal." jerry sandusky wore a red jail jump suit and a smile as he entered the center county courthouse this morning, less than two hours later, the smile was gone after the 68-year-old learned he will likely spend the rest of his life in prison. lead prosecutor. >> i believe that the sentence that the court imposed today was a wise and proper one and that it reflectedded the seriousness of the defendant's crimes. the harm he caused and the need to remove him from society. >> woo
? >> it really was. >> it's a science fantasy adventure. >> do we get the option? >> why do we need the option? >> >> when you have 100 people telling you it's the best movie you have seen in years, you start to think maybe it will be fairly successful. >> you teach somebody to be a director in a day? >> you can teach a monkey to be a director in a day. >> it's a great audience, the reactions you get, it's just terrific. >> i have not seen this proud since "goodwill hunting." >> all-star cast. look at that. >> it's coming out this weekend. look forward to seeing that. nice to see a passion when somebody is involved that deeply, directing in it and acting in it. >> invested. >> very invested. a long way since "aur ma tkpw tkpweden." remember that? >> oh, yeah. >>> you can find us on twitter, where? >> at abc -- >> that's what. >>> this morning, the candidates kick off a fresh week of candidates showing a new poll of a much tighter chase. >> and the running mates getting ready for their big face-off three days away. it's monday, october 8th. >>> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> sit fr
creation that is better than most states. we have in our science and technology sector, very strong sector growing, life science, biotech, i.t., professional services, health care with johns hopkins and others. >> governor? >> yes, sir. >> we had already, when the president proposed the american jobs act, we had already been over letting the bush tax cuts expire just for the rich, and keeping them for people less than 250. we had already had that argument three or four times and it was clear from the composition of congress at the time that the president put forth the american jobs act that there was no way that was going to happen. so letting it, where that was going to be a provision in the american jobs act was pure political posturing and in no way, he knew there was no way that that was going to pass. i just take issue with you saying that this was all republicans saying that they weren't going to, they were going to make sure the jobless rate was much higher. he knew full well that he could back them into the obstructionist corner by saying that we're definitely going to do that, mak
on this one. you think of people like steve balmer, jim cramer. >> but there is science behind this. >> more testosterone. >> it's the testosterone that kills the hair. you're more aggressive. you're an aggressor. >> how do you keep your hair? >> if zucker was still -- i would be nicer, he has a full head of hair so i'm not afraid right now. if some guy who is unfortunately is bald happens to end up in a powerful position, it's not because of being bald, it's in spite of being bald. toupees look like crap. you can't buy a decent toupee. >> rarely bald anymore. maybe works in business, not in politics, i don't know. kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global
they have to go through the process. i said same thing. it is not rocket science. you get all the cable traffic bouncing around. that gives you what you need then to sit down have interviews with people such as loot come they wood out there -- lieutenant colonel wood leading this force. department of state out there with maybe mobile security team. talk with the secure officer. and talk to people actually deployed in benghazi. you have all the information you need and --. bill: mike baker, live to us today. to our viewers at home the story is not going away. hem ear@foxnews.com. on twitter, @billhemmer. leave your question about or anything else that's on your mind. patti ann: matt kenseth may have won the race but a massive pileup turning tony stewart upside down literally at tall daigh gachlt we'll bring you amazing video. bill: tough times for california drivers, not nascar. >> well, it's pretty crazy. >> went up pretty high last week. >> jump them up real quick and takes them longer to get them back down. pretty ridiculous. bill: how much higher will they go? we're live in the golde
. on the other hand, rocket science is hard, and this is only the fourth launch of the falcon 9, spaceand should use this as a learning opportunity to strengthen the design of their vehicle. jon: well, it's actually a picture-perfect launch except for that, except for that explosion. you think that they will learn from it, they'll, you know, figure out whatever the problem was and the space program, the international space station supply program will continue on as intended? >> well, there are two people at nasa, the head of the human space flight division and the space station program, they have to both approve the results coming out of spacex to insure that they understand this failure, they put a corrective fix in, and they'll bless this fix. and if nasa's not satisfied, of course, they'll go back to the drawing boards until the test program shows it's safe to fly again. jon: tom jones, former astronaut for nasa, thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure, jon. jenna: doing what cheerleaders do best. jon: what? jenna: one of the things. the incredible video of a texas teen on a flipping frenzy
dwet into it, how do you judge the brand science. >> you look at the proportion of the earnings to the brand. put a number on how important is this brand to the economic power of the company. >> i'm saying now revealing it, why is coke number one and not apple? >> coca-cola, i mean, one thing about brands is that they are not just a measure of what's going on now. they are a view into the future as well. the thing about coca-cola that you can't deny, 100-year-plus history of consistently delivering great product and relevant brand to people. apple -- as far as apple is concerned, we know they're doing great right now, but there's concerns about what might happen in the near future with the loss of steve jobs. >> i understand why you're so focused on brands, because brands is what you do. you advertise companies. they pay you money to make their brand bigger. actually in a world in which we're connecting over the internet where i care if my coffee maker is purchasable on amazon rather than the brand of that coffee maker is what you do for a living becomes less relevant? >> i'd sa
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> four years after the financial crisis overrun by regulation, is wall street still rolling the dice when it comes to risk taking? we are reporting on the game of risk at america's biggest banks all day, and this time around how citigroup attended a turn-around after $60 billion in unforeseen mortgage losses severely damaged the bank. kate, i understand you spoke with citi's cro, brian leach. >> that's right. what he's done is interesting, if any bank had become a poster child during the crisis, it was is your honorly citi. they lost $60 billion due to ill-conceived mortgage investments. this put the bank out of business prompting multiple tax bailouts, which i'm sure you remember. he overall liquidation of capital investments. he's replaced 11 of 13 people who reported to him when he first took the job. he's also added a hong kong base, which they haven't had before. he made it so the bank can engage risk exposure around the world by product, so for example it can add up the global real est
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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